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Brexit: What comes next?

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Brexit: What comes next?

Nicholas Bukovec

/ 1 Minute zu lesen

After European elections in which Nigel Farage's Brexit Party won a sweeping victory, it now seems clear what the majority of British voters want. But the question is whether the British government can deliver, as euro|topics correspondent Nicholas Bukovec explains in this video.

Nigel Farage speaks during a Brexit Party event. (© picture-alliance, Photoshot)

The polls had predicted it and they were right: the newly founded Brexit Party led by Nigel Farage, a passionate proponent and key figure of Brexit, won the European elections in the UK by a considerable margin.

Farage's party won 30.7 percent of the vote, leaving the LibDems, firm opponents of Brexit, trailing far behind with 19.8 percent.

This unambiguous result does not, however, provide clarity on what comes next with Brexit. The only thing that is certain now is that Prime Minister Theresa May announced Externer Link: her resignation as leader of the Conservatives on 7 May .

In the following video euro|topics correspondent Nicholas Bukovec discusses the current state of affairs in the UK.

Brexit: What comes next?

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Brexit: What comes next?

In this video euro|topics correspondent Nicholas Bukovec discusses the current state of affairs in the UK.

is the euro|topics correspondent for the UK and Ireland. He studied political science, history and economics in Vienna, Dublin and Limerick. From 1999 to 2011 he worked as a political and international editor for the daily newspaper Kurier in Vienna. Since 2011 he has been based in Dublin, working as a freelance journalist and for an online marketing platform.